Hosts
Gene Rayburn
Jack Barry (sub)
Dayton Allen (sub)
Keefe Brasselle (sub)
Fred Robbins (sub)
Announcer
Roger Tuttle
Broadcast
Dough Re Mi.png
NBC Daytime: 2/24/1958 – 12/30/1960
Packagers
Barry & Enright Productions (1958)
NBC Productions (1958–1960)

"NBC Television presents... Dough Re Mi! And here's your host, Gene Rayburn/Jack Barry/Dayton Allen/Keefe Brasselle/Fred Robbins!"

Dough Re Mi was a musical game show similar to Name That Tune.

Gameplay[edit | edit source]

Three contestants competed to identify song titles using the first few notes. Each game consisted of three songs worth $100, $300, and $500, respectively. The contestants were each given a $200 bankroll to start the game. In each round, each contestant was given one opportunity to guess the title of the song after the first three notes were played. If the song title was guessed correctly, the contestant won the value of the song.

If nobody could identify the song, the fourth note was then put up for bid in a similar format to The Price is Right. Each player, one at a time, would take turns bidding any amount of their bankrolls until either a bell rang or all players had stopped bidding.

The first four notes were then played for the contestant with the highest bid. If the song title was guessed correctly, the contestant won the value of the song. If the title was guessed incorrectly, the contestant could recoup by challenging their opponents. If the challenged player could not guess the title of the song, they lost half of their bid and bidding started for the fifth note, and so on. However, if the challenged player correctly guessed the title, the challenger lost their entire bid and the challenged player won the value of the song.

The player with the most money in their bankroll following the third song won the game.

Viewer's Contest[edit | edit source]

This show also had a home audience participation segment wherein on Mondays two notes were played for the home audience to try and guess the song and send in a Postcard with that title. On Tuesday they would play three notes for the same purpose and continue through the week. The following week a prize was awarded by selecting a winning Postcard.

Celebrities[edit | edit source]

Occasionally, celebrities would appear and play the game for charity. Among the celebrities who appeared were Lou Costello, Florence Henderson, Jaye P. Morgan, and Peter Marshall.

Scandal[edit | edit source]

Partly due to being developed by Jack Barry and Dan Enright, Dough Re Mi was one of the games caught in the quiz show scandals. Like Concentration, the show was bought by NBC and became an in-house production.

Pictures[edit | edit source]

Tickets[edit | edit source]

Merchandise[edit | edit source]

A board game, complete with an eight-key xylophone, was released in 1960 by Lowell Toy Mfg. Since its release, the game has become very hard to find - a copy complete with the xylophone is both very rare and, when a complete copy surfaces, very expensive.

Studio[edit | edit source]

NBC Studio 8H, New York City, NY

Links[edit | edit source]

Dough Re Mi at BoardGameGeek

YouTube Videos[edit | edit source]

Intro of an episode

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