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Jeopardy! airs some special tournaments throughout the season. Most of the tournaments start on a Monday and some tournaments started on Wednesday. February, May and November are the common months for the premiere of new tournaments. Eliminated contestants leave with some departing money for participating in the tournament. The longer you stay in the tournament, the more money you're likely to win.

Tournaments[]

The tournament format was itself devised by Alex Trebek, expanding on a format used during the original series. Each lasts 2 weeks over 10 episodes. In all games bar the finals, the players play for points (though dollar signs are still used for aesthetic purposes); for the finals, they play for cash.

  • Quarterfinal (Games 1-5), Day 1 of Recording: 3 competitors from each game. The winner of each game advances to the semifinals, and among those who did not win, the four players in the order of the highest final score advance to the semifinals as wild cards. DJ! in case of a tie, Selections are made in the order of results at the end of the round, and in case of a tie, Jeopardy! Selection will be made based on performance at the end of the round. If there is a game where all 3 players end at 0 or less, there is no automatic semifinalist in that game and a wild card is added. For fairness between wildcards, players who have not yet played a game are isolated in a separate space so that they do not know the outcome of the previous game.
  • Semifinal (Games 6-8): Only the winner of each game advances to the next round. Even if all three players end under 0, the tiebreaker will determine the winner.[1]
  • Final (Games 9, 10): The cumulative results of the two games will determine 1st to 3rd place. The two games are separate, so you can't bet the prize money you won on the first day in the Daily Double or Final Jeopardy! on the second day. DJ in each game! Competitors with a negative score at the end will receive a $0 grade for that day.

In general, there is a set prize money for each advancement stage, and the finalist gets the greater of the minimum guaranteed prize money or the two-day cumulative performance.

In the original series, each tournament only had nine participants and simply consisted of three semifinal matches and the two-day final, with all players keeping their money at the end of each game, and Grand Champions also receiving the tournament prize.

Tournament of Champions[]

Featuring champions who won the most games (minimum of three regular-play wins to qualify until the 2021 tournament, minimum of four regular-play wins to qualify effective the 2022 tournament) as well as winners of the College Championship. In the first 19 seasons, all 5-time undefeated champs automatically qualified. Leading up to 2000, winners of the Teen Tournament were guaranteed a spot in the Tournament of Champions. Since 2011, winners of the Teachers Tournament (except Larry Martin, who suddenly and unexpectedly died shortly after winning the 2018 event) were guaranteed spots in the ToC. Effective the 2022 tournament, the winners of the Professors Tournament and National College Championship will be guaranteed a slot in the ToC. Unlike other tournaments (see below), the contestants not playing in their respective quarterfinal game are not allowed to watch from the audience, as the point is to win their quarterfinal game rather than simply beating a wild card score.

Winning the ToC is a great honor for Jeopardy's contestants. The contestants who set the best record in the regular game do not even win the championship, but are eliminated from the preliminary rounds, and there are cases where the Top 3 do not even make it to the finals. So many things happen in the ToC, and in the S22, 19-win champ David Madden and 6-win champ Kevin Marshall even lost to 4-win champ Bill MacDonald in the semifinals.

Also, even for a 10+ time champion, it's really hard to win. In addition, legendary champion Ken Jennings, with 74 wins, continued to lose to Brad Rutter in other tournaments, but ultimately emerged victorious in the Greatest of All Time tournament in 2020. As if to disprove that, James Holzhauer is the only ToC winner among the champions who have won 10 or more games in regular competition so far. He wouldn't have won if it hadn't been for a wide gap with Emma Boettcher in Game 1 of the final. Like the World Cup, ToC has many variables, so it can be said to be an interesting competition for viewers.

Rematches are often held in one tournament. The winner of the group and the wildcard contestant often face off in the final, and in S26, the contestants from group 5 had a rematch in the final. Starting from S21, participants who competed in regular competitions had rematches in ToC, and so far, they have occurred in S22, S29, and S36.

During the Fleming-era tournaments, Grand Champions won a tropical vacation and were presented with a trophy called the Griffin Award, named for Merv Griffin himself.

Occurance Season Airdate Finale
1 2 November 11, 1985 November 22, 1985
2 3 November 3, 1986 November 14, 1986
3 4 November 9, 1987 November 20, 1987
4 5 November 7, 1988 November 18, 1988
5 6 November 6, 1989 November 17, 1989
6 7 November 5, 1990 November 16, 1990
7 8 November 4, 1991 November 15, 1991
8 9 November 9, 1992 November 20, 1992
9 10 November 15, 1993 November 26, 1993
10 11 November 14, 1994 November 25, 1994
11 12 November 13, 1995 November 24, 1995
12 13 November 18, 1996 November 29, 1996
13 14 February 2, 1998 February 13, 1998
14 15 February 8, 1999 February 19, 1999
15 16 May 8, 2000 May 19, 2000
16 18 October 22, 2001 November 2, 2001
17 19 May 5, 2003 May 16, 2003
18 21 September 20, 2004 October 1, 2004
19 22 May 8, 2006 May 19, 2006
20 24 November 5, 2007 November 16, 2007
21 25 March 11, 2009 March 24, 2009
22 26 May 10, 2010 May 21, 2010
23 28 November 2, 2011 November 15, 2011
24 29 February 13, 2013 February 26, 2013
25 31 November 10, 2014 November 21, 2014
26 32 November 9, 2015 November 20, 2015
27 34 November 6, 2017 November 17, 2017
28 36 November 4, 2019 November 16, 2019
29 37 May 17, 2021 May 28, 2021
30 39 November, 2022 November, 2022

Teen Tournament[]

An annual tournament featured high school students ages 13-17. The format structure was similar to that of the Tournament of Champions. On the current syndicated version, the Teen Tournament started on February 16, 1987. In November 1998, a Teen Reunion Tournament was held at the Wang Center in Boston, bringing back 12 former Teen Tournament contestants to compete in a single-elimination tournament.

At least one similar tournament was held during the original series in May 1967, involving high school seniors and the winner receiving a $10,000 scholarship.

  • There was a 2nd Teen Tournament that took place during S23 to start the Summer Games.
  • There was no Teen Tournament in Seasons 31, 32, 34, 36-38; and it is possible that the Teen Tournament has already been discontinued.
  • In Season 35, two Teen Tournaments were held: The first was held in November 2018, and the second was held in June 2019 in response to the many teens who took the online test and auditioned to get on the show.
Occurance Season Airdate Finale
1 3 February 16, 1987 February 27, 1987
2 4 February 8, 1988 February 19, 1988
3 5 February 6, 1989 February 17, 1989
4 6 February 5, 1990 February 16, 1990
5 7 February 11, 1991 February 22, 1991
6 8 February 24, 1992 March 6, 1992
7 9 February 1, 1993 February 12, 1993
8 10 February 7, 1994 February 18, 1994
9 11 February 6, 1995 February 17, 1995
10 12 May 6, 1996 May 17, 1996
11 13-A February 3, 1997 February 14, 1997
12 14-B November 3, 1997 November 14, 1997
13 15-A February 22, 1999 March 5, 1999
14 16-B November 1, 1999 November 12, 1999
15 17 April 30, 2001 May 11, 2001
16 18 February 4, 2002 February 15, 2002
17 19 February 3, 2003 February 14, 2003
18 20 February 9, 2004 February 20, 2004
19 21 January 26, 2005 February 8, 2005
20 22 February 6, 2006 February 17, 2006
21 23-A February 5, 2007 February 16, 2007
22 23-B July 16, 2007 July 27, 2007
23 24-A February 11, 2008 February 22, 2008
24 25-B November 10, 2008 November 21, 2008
25 26 November 2, 2009 November 13, 2009
26 27 February 17, 2011 March 2, 2011
27 28 April 30, 2012 May 11, 2012
28 29 January 30, 2013 February 12, 2013
29 30 July 21, 2014 August 1, 2014
30 33 November 9, 2016 November 22, 2016
31 35-A November 7, 2018 November 20, 2018
32 35-B June 17, 2019 June 28, 2019

Seniors Tournament[]

The Seniors Tournament, which launched in 1987, featured 15 contestants all aged 50 and older (hence the name); the same format used for the Tournament of Champions and Teen Tournament (the latter of which launched 3 months prior) was used. Since its discontinuation in 1995, players aged 50 and older have appeared in regular games. As always, the winner received an automatic spot in the Tournament of Champions.

Occurance Season Airdate Finale
1 3 May 4, 1987 May 15, 1987
2 4 May 9, 1988 May 20, 1988
3 5 July 10, 1989 July 21, 1989
4 6 July 9, 1990 July 20, 1990
5 7 July 8, 1991 July 19, 1991
6 8 July 6, 1992 July 17, 1992
7 9 July 12, 1993 July 23, 1993
8 10 July 11, 1994 July 22, 1994
9 11 July 10, 1995 July 21, 1995
10 12 December 18, 1995 December 29, 1995


College Championship[]

The College Championship has been held annually featuring college students, all full-time undergrad students without prior degrees. The structure is similar to the Teen Tournament and Tournament of Champions. The very first College Championship premiered on May 8, 1989.

  • There was no College Championship in Season 31, 35 and 37.
  • The first winner, Tom Cubbage, also won the 1989 ToC, with Jeff Stewart runner-up at the 1994 ToC and Cliff Galiher third at the 2007 ToC.
Occurance Season Airdate Finale
1 5 May 8, 1989 May 19, 1989
2 6 May 7, 1990 May 18, 1990
3 7 May 6, 1991 May 17, 1991
4 8 May 4, 1992 May 15, 1992
5 9 May 3, 1993 May 14, 1993
6 10 May 2, 1994 May 13, 1994
7 11 May 1, 1995 May 12, 1995
8 12 February 12, 1996 February 23, 1996
9 13 May 12, 1997 May 23, 1997
10 14 May 4, 1998 May 15, 1998
11 15 May 3, 1999 May 14, 1999
12 16-A February 7, 2000 February 18, 2000
13 17-B November 8, 2000 November 21, 2000
14 18 November 7, 2001 November 20, 2001
15 19 November 11, 2002 November 22, 2002
16 20 November 10, 2003 November 21, 2003
17 21 November 10, 2004 November 23, 2004
18 22 November 7, 2005 November 18, 2005
19 23 April 30, 2007 May 11, 2007
20 24 May 5, 2008 May 16, 2008
21 25 May 4, 2009 May 15, 2009
22 26-A February 1, 2010 February 12, 2010
23 27-B November 8, 2010 November 19, 2010
24 28 February 1, 2012 February 14, 2012
25 29 May 6, 2013 May 17, 2013
26 30 February 10, 2014 February 21, 2014
27 32 February 1, 2016 February 12, 2016
28 33 February 13, 2017 February 24, 2017
29 34 April 9, 2018 April 20, 2018
30 36 April 6, 2020 April 17, 2020

Teachers Tournament[]

The Teachers Tournament debuted in 2011, and features 15 teachers competing in the same 2-week format as the Tournament of Champions, Teen Tournament, and College Championship. The first Teachers Tournament debuted on May 2, 2011. And the last one was held during Season 36. It is presumed that the Teachers Tournament was discontinued in 2020, and subsequently replaced by the Professors Tournament in 2021.

  • No Teachers Tournament was held in Season 37, and in Season 38 the Professors Tournament was held instead.
  • Larry Martin, the champion for the 2018 Teachers Tournament, suddenly and unexpectedly died January 25, 2019, eight months after winning the tournament, before competing in the 2019 Tournament of Champions.
  • Colby Burnett, the winner of the competition, won the 2013 ToC, while Francois Barcomb finished third at the 2019 ToC.
Occurance Season Airdate Finale
1 27 May 2, 2011 May 13, 2011
2 28 February 15, 2012 February 28, 2012
3 29 November 7, 2012 November 20, 2012
4 30 November 11, 2013 November 22, 2013
5 31 February 2, 2015 February 13, 2015
6 32 May 2, 2016 May 13, 2016
7 33 May 8, 2017 May 19, 2017
8 34 May 7, 2018 May 18, 2018
9 35 May 6, 2019 May 17, 2019
10 36 May 25, 2020 June 5, 2020

Special Tournaments[]

Super Jeopardy![]

Super Jeopardy! aired Saturday nights on ABC in summer 1990 (from June 16 to September 8). It featured 35 former champions from the first six seasons of the current version plus Burns Cameron, a former champion from the Art Fleming era; this tournament awarded a $250,000 top cash prize to the winner and was hence referred to as "The $250,000 Challenge" (worded as "The Quarter-of-a-Million-Dollar Challenge"). As usual, the players played for points, though with increased values (200-1,000 in the Jeopardy round, 500-2,500 in the Double Jeopardy round; the only time where the second round values were not double the first), and there were four contestants in each quarterfinal match; the semifinals and final itself had the usual three. For the quarterfinals and semifinals themselves, there were no wild card spots for the high-scorers among non-winners; it was "win or go home".

Day # Episode #
1 June 16, 1990
2 June 23, 1990
3 June 30, 1990
4 July 7, 1990
5 July 14, 1990
6 July 21, 1990
7 July 28, 1990
8 August 4, 1990
9 August 11, 1990
10 August 18, 1990
11 August 25, 1990
12 September 1, 1990
13 September 8, 1990

10th Anniversary Tournament[]

From November 29, 1993 to December 3, 1993, Jeopardy! held a special one-week 10th Anniversary Tournament to honor the Trebek version's tenth anniversary, featuring one Tournament of Champions-qualified contestant from each of the first nine seasons. Eight contestants were drawn at random and revealed over the course of four episodes. After Tom Nosek won the 1993 Tournament of Champions, he received the ninth position.

The contestants competed for a winner's prize of a combined two-day final score total plus a $25,000 bonus. The event resembled the show's regular tournaments (albeit without a quarterfinal round), with three semifinal matches to determine three finalists, who then competed against each other in a two-game total point match.

  • Frank Spangenberg won the tournament.

International Tournament/Olympic Games Tournament[]

The International Tournament featured contestants from various countries around the world. The very first international tournament, The Olympic Games Tournament, took place at Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City, California from July 15 to 18, 1996 to commemorate the Centennial Summer Olympic Games, which opened on July 19 in Atlanta, Georgia. All the players who participated in the tournament spoke English. There were only nine contestants from nine different countries and the winners of the three semifinal matches got to qualify in a one-day final. From May 5 to 9, 1997, the show traveled out of North America to Stockholm, Sweden for the second International Tournament where Magnus Harenstam was the show's announcer. The categories were revealed in Swedish before being translated into English. It was the only international tournament to still have a three-day semifinal match and a two-day final match. From February 12-16, 2001, the third international tournament took place at the Las Vegas Hilton in Las Vegas, Nevada for another three semifinal matches and a two-day final match.

Occurance Season Airdate Finale
1 12 July 15, 1996 July 18, 1996
2 13 May 5, 1997 May 9, 1997
3 17 February 12, 2001 February 16, 2001

Million Dollar Masters Tournament[]

The Million Dollar Masters Tournament was held in May 2002 to commemorate the show's 4000th episode, featuring former champions competing for $1,000,000 in a format similar to that of the regular tournaments. The shows were taped at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, NY.

Ultimate Tournament of Champions[]

  • The Ultimate Tournament of Champions was held from February 9, 2005 to May 25, 2005, featuring former champions from the past 21 seasons, all vying to compete against 74-game champion Ken Jennings in a three-day final for $2,000,000.
  • Members of the "Nifty Nine" were selected based on records set in their Jeopardy careers. Only Rutter and Spangenberg advanced beyond their initial round.
  • Unlike most Jeopardy! tournaments, in which only the final rounds are played for cash, the winners of every match received their scores as winnings (or the guaranteed minimum for that round, whichever was greater). In addition, in all rounds, there were no "wild card" spots for the non-winners; it was "win or go home".
  • Round 4 featured two two-day matches; Round 5 featured a three-day final match.
Round Airdate Finale
1 February 9, 2005 April 12, 2005
2 April 13, 2005 May 6, 2005
3 May 9, 2005 May 16, 2005
4 May 17, 2005 May 20, 2005
5 May 23, 2005 May 25, 2005

Battle of the Decades Tournament[]

The Battle of the Decades Tournament was held from February 3, 2014 to May 16, 2014, to commemorate the show's 30th anniversary in syndication. 45 former champions from the past 30 years, represented by decade—1980s (1984-1993), 1990s (1994-2003), and 2000s (2004-2013) all competed in three separate preliminary rounds, with no wild cards for the high-scorers among non-winners; as it was "win or go home". The 15 winners participated in five quarterfinal matches similar to that of the other tournaments, with the five winners and four wild cards for the high-scorers among non-winners advancing to the semifinals. For the semifinals, only the winners advanced to the two-day finals, where $1,000,000 was paid to the winner.

Round Airdate Finale
1980s Preliminary February 3, 2014 February 7, 2014
1990s Preliminary March 3, 2014 March 7, 2014
2000s Preliminary March 31, 2014 April 4, 2014
Quarterfinal ~ Final Match May 5, 2014 May 16, 2014

National College Championship[]

  • The Jeopardy! National College Championship is airing on ABC Primetime.
  • Hosted by Mayim Bialik, 36 of America’s sharpest undergrads will enter this collegiate competition, but only one will claim the $250,000 grand prize, the title of Jeopardy! National College Champion, and an automatic spot in the next Tournament of Champions. Second place takes home $100,000, and third place leaves with $50,000. The remaining contestants will receive the following prizes: $35,000 (fourth place), $20,000 (8 semifinalists eliminated), and $10,000 (24 quarterfinalists eliminated).
  • In addition, in all rounds, there were no "wild card" spots for the non-winners; it was "win or go home".
  • This could possibly be the successor to the College Championship.
Round Airdate Finale
Quarterfinal February 8, 2022 February 16, 2022
Semifinal February 17, 2022 February 18, 2022
Final February 22, 2022 February 22, 2022

Jeopardy! Second Chance Tournament[]

TBD

Events[]

Celebrity Jeopardy![]

A special edition of the show featuring celebrities competing for their favorite charities. Premiering in 1992, these games are usually week-long events, and occasionally are called Power Players Week featuring personalities in politics and journalism. The difficulty of the material is significantly reduced, and because of that, it was parodied several times on Saturday Night Live. Unlike regular play, where a player finishing Double Jeopardy! with zero or a negative score is disqualified from playing in Final Jeopardy!, celebrities who finish the second round with zero or negative are guaranteed a positive score to work with in the final round.

Here, even if everyone is under $0, nobody loser, Double Jeopardy! The winner is determined by score.[2]

It has not been held for a while since the Power Players Week held in Washington in 2016, but it is expected to resume in the fall of 2022 with the Primetime version after 6 years.

Road Trips[]

  • Starting in 1997, some of these tournaments and events were taped at venues outside Culver City. For instance, from 1997 to 2008, the College Championship was taped at a college campus (the 2000-A College Championship, however, was taped in Culver City).
  • Power Players Week was always taped at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington D.C. The Million Dollar Masters Tournament and 2006 Celebrity Jeopardy! games were taped at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, NY.
  • The Tournament of Champions was taped on the road twice, in 2000 and 2009 respectively; the 2009 ToC was taped at the Consumer Electronics Show, NV.
  • Seasons 26, 29, 30, 31, 34 or later were during this time span that didn't have any road shows, probably because it was the first season with the current set.

Kids Week/Back to School Week[]

It began on September 6, 1999 at the start of the show's 16th season and featured 10–12-year-old children (except for Season 30). Like regular play, winners kept whatever they have won at the end of the game while the second and third place finishers received consolation prizes. However, there were no returning champions for this event. A Kids Week Reunion was held during the second week of Season 25 bringing back 15 Kids Week alumni from 1999 and 2000. The games have been discontinued after a Season 31 Kids Week contestant who was eliminated before Final Jeopardy! ran backstage crying to her mom upon hearing the bad news.

In case of a tie, the game is decided by a tiebreaker issue just like in a tournament (September 20, 2002).

Occurance Season Airdate Finale
1 16 September 6, 1999 September 10, 1999
2 17-A October 2, 2000 October 6, 2000
3 17-B December 25, 2000 December 29, 2000
4 18-A September 24, 2001 September 28, 2001
5 18-B December 24, 2001 December 28, 2001
6 19-A September 16, 2002 September 20, 2002
7 19-B January 6, 2003 January 10, 2003
8 20-A September 22, 2003 September 26, 2003
9 20-B May 3, 2004 May 7, 2004
10 21-C October 18, 2004 October 22, 2004
11 22 October 10, 2005 October 14, 2005
12 23 October 2, 2006 October 6, 2006
13 24 October 8, 2007 October 12, 2007
14 25-A September 15, 2008 September 19, 2008
15 25-B July 13, 2009 July 17, 2009
16 26 July 5, 2010 July 9, 2010
17 27 July 4, 2011 July 8, 2011
18 28 July 30, 2012 August 3, 2012
19 29 July 29, 2013 August 2, 2013
20 31 December 1, 2014 December 5, 2014

The IBM Challenge[]

An exhibition match was held February 14-16, 2011, featuring Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter competing against the Watson supercomputer for $1,000,000. Second place won $300,000 and third place won $200,000. All three players donated their winnings to a charity of their choice.

All-Star Games[]

  • The JEOPARDY! All-Star Games aired from February 20 to March 5, 2019; six teams of three competed for a chance at $1,000,000. Only one member per team can participate in each round of play.
  • Each preliminary tournament match consists of two games spread out over three nights and the three highest-scoring non-winning teams will play in the Wild Card match.
  • The two winning teams, and the highest-scoring Wild Card team play in a two-day total point final match, where the winning team wins $1,000,000. Second place splits $300,000, and third place splits $100,000.

The Greatest of All Time[]

This tournament lasted from January 7 to 14, 2020, and consisted of the top three winners in Jeopardy! history in Brad Rutter, Ken Jennings, and James Holzhauer, all in a contest to determine who truly is The Greatest of All Time. Like Super Jeopardy!, Rock & Roll Jeopardy! (first two seasons), Sports Jeopardy!, and Jep!, scores were kept in points and not dollars, though using the exact same values as the parent show. Each episode was played as a two-game total point match similar to a regular tournament's final match: whoever has the highest total at the end of the episode wins a match, while three matches wins $1,000,000 and the Greatest of All Time trophy. The runners-up each received $250,000. Ken Jennings won the tournament, not only notching his first ever tournament win, but also handing his primary opponent Brad Rutter his only human loss (remember the IBM Challenge does not count).

Money Guarantees[]

Tournament of Champions[]

Period Quarterfinalists Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
Tournament #1 (1985; Season 2) $1,000 $5,000 Kept two-day total winnings $100,000
Tournament #2 (1986; Season 3) $5,000
Tournament #3 to #12 (1987–1996; Season 4–13) $7,500 $10,000
Tournament #13 to #16 (1998–2001; Season 14–16, 18) $2,500 $10,000 $15,000
Tournament #17 to #18 (2003–2004; Season 19, 21) $5,000 $10,000 $25,000 $50,000 $250,000
Tournament #19 onwards (2006–present; Season 22, 24–26, 28–29, 31–32, 34, 36–37) $50,000 $100,000

Teen Tournament[]

Period Quarterfinalists Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
Tournament #1 to #11 (1987–Winter 1997; Season 3–13) $1,000 $5,000 $7,500 $10,000 $25,000
Tournament #12 to #14 (Fall 1997–Fall 1999; Season 14–16) $2,500 $10,000 $15,000
Tournament #15 (2001; Season 17) $50,000
Tournament #16 to #17 (2002–2003; Season 18–19) $15,000 $20,000
Tournament #18 to #19 (2004–2005; Season 20–21) $25,000 $75,000
Touranment #20 to #29 (2006–2014; Season 22–30) $5,000 $10,000
Tournament #30 onward (2016-present; Season 33, 35) $25,000 $50,000 $100,000

Seniors Tournament[]

Quarterfinalists Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
$1,000 $5,000 $7,500 $10,000 $25,000

College Championship[]

Period Quarterfinalists Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
Tournament #1 to #9 (1989–1997; Season 5–13) $1,000 $5,000 $7,500 $10,000 $25,000
Tournament #10 to #11 (1998–1999; Season 14–15) $2,500 $10,000 $15,000
Tournament #12 to #15 (Winter 2000–2002; Season 16–19) $50,000
Tournament #16 (2003; Season 20) $15,000 $25,000
Touranemnt #17 onward (2004–present; Season 21–30, 32–34, 36) $5,000 $10,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000

Super Jeopardy![]

Quarterfinalists Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
$5,000 $10,000 $25,000 $50,000 $250,000

10th Anniversary Tournament[]

Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
$5,000 $7,500 $10,000 Two-game total + $25,000

International Tournament/Olympic Games Tournament[]

Period Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
Tournaments #1 & #2 (1996–1997; Season 12–13) $5,000 $7,500 $10,000 $25,000
Tournament #3 (2001; Season 17) $10,000 $15,000 $50,000

Kids Week/Back To School Week[]

Period 2nd Runner-Up 1st Runner-up Winner (Minimum Guarantees)
1999-2000 (Seasons 16-17) Prizes $5,000 ($5,000 to the week's highest Winner) + Prizes
2001 Back To School Week (Season 18) $5,000 (minimum guarantees) $10,000
Miscellaneous Kids Weeks (2001-2009; Seasons 18-25) Prizes in Season 18, but changed to $2,000 for 2nd Place and $1,000 for 3rd Place in Season 19.
2008 Kids Week Reunion (Season 25) $2,500 $5,000 $25,000
2010-2014 (Seasons 26-29 and 31) $1,000 $2,000 $15,000

Million Dollar Masters[]

Quarterfinalists Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
$10,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000 $1,000,000

Ultimate Tournament of Champions[]

Round # 2nd Runner-up 1st Runner-up Winner (minimum guarantees)
Round 1 $5,000 $15,000
Round 2 $10,000 $20,000
Round 3 $15,000 $30,000
Round 4 $20,000 (minimum guarantees) $30,000 (minimum guarantees) $50,000
Round 5 $250,000 $500,000 $2,000,000

Teachers Tournament[]

Quarterfinalists Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
$5,000 $10,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000

Battle of the Decades[]

Preliminaries Quarterfinalists Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
$5,000 $10,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000 $1,000,000

All-Star Games[]

First-eliminated team Wildcard-eliminated team Finalists (minimum guarantees)
2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
$50,000 $75,000 $100,000 $300,000 $1,000,000

National College Championship[]

Quarterfinalists Semifinalists Finalists (minimum guarantees)
3rd runner-up 2nd runner-up 1st runner-up Winner
$10,000 $20,000 $35,000 $50,000 $100,000 $250,000
  1. Until 2013, wildcards were added as in the quarterfinals, but after the winner of the semifinal wildcard winner at the 2013 Teen Tournament, this has changed.
  2. November 13, 1996 and March 2, 1998, the former gave everyone $10,000 in donations, and ranked DJ! It was decided in order of score.
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