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Host
Chris Harrison
Broadcast
Mall Masters @ mall of america.jpg
Mm logo.gif
Pilot: 12/2000
Game Show Network (Daily): 1/29/2001 – 4/27/2001 (reruns aired until 8/31/2001)
Packagers
Stone-Stanley Entertainment/Game Show Network

"From the state that gave us rollerblades, the Vikings, and a mall with over 500 stores, and a seven-acre indoor theme park, it's Mall Masters, at Mall of America, and I'm your host, Chris Harrison."

Mall Masters (also known as Mall Masters at Mall of America) was a short-lived shopping game show taped at the Mall of America.

Gameplay[]

Three contestants competed in a game of knowledge and surveys at the world-famous Mall of America in Bloomington, MN.

Main Game[]

The First Two Rounds[]

Host Harrison read a toss-up survey question based on a poll of 100 shoppers at the Mall of America with three choices. The first one to buzz in with the most popular answer (which was the correct answer) earned the right to choose from one of four stores inside the Mall of America. If incorrect, the correct answer was revealed and the other two players were asked a question with the third player locked out. If one of those players got that question wrong, then the remaining player would be asked another question unopposed. If that player got the question wrong, the next question was asked to all three players once again (if this was ever the case, only the last question(s) asked to that point (including the one that ultimately determined who would choose a store), were kept and aired).

Once a store was picked, a shopper in the mall (who appeared and communicated via a closed-circuit camera) would team up with the contestant to answer a general knowledge question associated with that store in some way (this time, with four choices). The shopper would give his/her answer, and the contestant could then agree or disagree with the shopper's pick. If the in-studio contestant disagreed, he/she had to choose from the other three possibilities. If the contestant chose the correct answer, he/she scored points. Once a store was picked, it was gone, and another store took its place. If the shopper got the question right, regardless if the contestant got it right or wrong, he/she received a $50 gift certificate from the Mall of America.

Scoring[]
  • Round 1 – 100 points
  • Round 2 – 200 points

A total of five store questions were played in these rounds.

Round 3: Lightning Round[]

This round was played with 90 seconds (1 minute and 30 seconds) on the clock. A general knowledge question was asked, and the first player to buzz-in with the correct answer scored 100 points; if he/she was wrong, however, the other two players would have a chance to answer, and only two players were allowed to answer each question.

When time expired, the player with the highest score won the game and advanced to the bonus round. If the game ended in a tie, a tie-breaker question was asked, and the first contestant to buzz-in was allowed to answer; if he/she was correct, he/she won the game, but if he/she was wrong, he/she automatically lost (in case of a three-way tie, the other two players would have a chance to answer, and if either of them was incorrect, the last contestant won).

Bonus Round[]

The winning contestant was asked up to nine questions, all asked regarding one store in the Mall of America in any way possible. Each question had two possible answers, and choosing the correct answer scored a point for that question; choosing the incorrect answer (or failing to answer within ten seconds), however, gave the contestant a strike, and three strikes ended the bonus round. If the contestant could answer seven of the nine questions correctly, he/she won $5,000 (accompanied by a "$5,000" graphic and footage of shoppers applauding appearing on the video wall; otherwise, he/she received $100 for each correct answer.

Trivia[]

This was the third of three Stone-Stanley game shows set inside a mall (real or fake). The first two were Born Lucky and the super-successful Shop 'Til You Drop (1991-2002 Pat Finn era). It was also one of the select-few game shows from this same packager that never offered a vacation as a grand prize.

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